Patriotism rules, OK!

It seems the great British public is rather sentimental and has a lot more patriotic fervour than they are sometimes given credit for.

On May 28th, the Official Charts Company – behind the long-running UK Top 40 pop rundown – set up weekly Official Classical Singles and Albums charts to reflect the rising popularity of individual tracks, which saw downloads increase by 46 per cent in 2011 compared with 2010.

At the time, chief executive Mark Talbot said the new launch underlined “how classical music is reaching into the mainstream”, five months after the Military Wives became the first classical choir to take the much-coveted number one spot on the Official Singles Chart.

Now, thanks to the classical charts, we can see what people are finding interesting – and they’ve definitely found a place for Britain in their hearts this year.

The top ten classical singles, as of June 16th, are:

1. God Save The Queen (BBC CO/Wordsworth)

2. Pomp and Circumstance March in D Major (BBC CO/Wordsworth)

3. Rule Britannia (Della Jones)

4. Land of Hope and Glory (Gary Barlow/Commonwealth Band)

5. God Save The Queen (National Anthem) (Gary Barlow/Commonwealth Band)

6. Wherever You Are (Military Wives/Gareth Malone)

7. Jerusalem (BBC CO/Wordsworth)

8. I Vow To Thee, My Country (Della Jones)

9. God Save The Queen (London Army Band & Choir)

10. Nessun Dorma (Luciano Pavarotti)

Isn’t that interesting? It’s definitely nice to know that people in Britain do still have pride in their little old country – and that the monarchy is still considered worthy by so many.

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